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Prepping, Washing, Storing and Stripping the Cloth Diapers

You have landed on this page, probably because you are keen on starting to cloth diaper your baby or you are already doing it and want to know, how others deal with cloth diapers’ nitty-gritties.
We begin with prepping the diapers.
Your fluff mail has arrived and you can’t wait to see the little bums dressed bright and beautiful; but  heyy, hold on; you’ve got to wait! It is important to prepare the diapers for use, mainly for two reasons:
a.       Hygiene: Just like you wash any other piece of cloth before putting it on to your baby’s sensitive skin, these diapers too need to be pre-washed.

b.       Absorbency: The natural fibres (cotton and hemp) have residual oil that restricts the absorbency, hence you need multiple washes before you can use them
Now, the question is how do you prep the diapers? Mostly you will find the prepping and washing instructions mentioned on the packaging that the diapers come in.
However, the simplest way to prep is giving a wash in detergent and then run a few (2-3) more wash cycles in regular (without detergent) water. This will get rid of the residual oils and any detergent from your first wash. The synthetic fibres like polyester and microfibres can be just washed with detergent and given a second run in regular detergent-free cycle.
Washing the diapers
The solids are to be knocked off before putting the diapers for wash. For pocket diapers, what I follow is just knock off the solids, good if it falls off easily, if it doesn’t then I gently take the insert out and use hand-faucet to get rid of the remaining sticky poop. This helps in avoiding the inserts from staining. Once the solids are taken off, I just wash the diaper with regular water and put it in the diaper pail.
Initially, I hand washed all the baby clothes, but I have found machine wash better than hand washing. I use regular detergent (Tide/surf excel/Ariel) and they seem to do pretty good job for me. You could also give a try to the eco-friendly detergents that are available in the market. Conditioners and fabric softeners are a big No-No for CDs, as they tend to leave a non-absorbent coat on the fabric, which may affect the absorbency of the diaper.
After machine/hand wash it is always better to sun-dry the diapers, the ultra-violets rays from the sun helps killing the bacteria. Sun drying also helps in lightening the stains; you know how a piece of colourful cloth or plastic lightens in colour once left in the sun for too long? Similarly, the CD stains too get light or vanish post sun-drying.
 Folding and keeping the diapers
For some time initially, I would just keep the inserts and diapers separately; but I realised that stuffing the cover/pocket diapers and then storing saves much time and is extremely convenient during diaper changing sessions.
How I fold the diapers:-
Step one: Stuff the diaper with the insert

Step Two: Lay the diaper flat, wrong side up

Step Three: Fold the front part towards inside, and keep rolling until it becomes compact like the picture below (in step 4).

Step Four: Button it up tight.

I stack my stash in a drawer Konmari style.

Stripping the Cloth Diapers

If you have just started Cloth diapering, then you need not have to worry about stripping for many months to come, until your diapers start stinking awfully bad like ammonia. The diapers start stinking mostly because of the detergent build-up or if they aren’t being cleaned properly. Initially I was handwashing our diapers and in few months, they started smelling bad; I had to strip them and now I have switched to washing machine completely.
Stripping is mainly getting rid of the detergent build up. Please read the warranty (if any) of your diapers, because sometimes the warranty may get void if you strip the diaper.
How I stripped our diapers; well, I soaked them (clean diapers) in hot water for more than 30 minutes (we don’t have any hot water connection to our washing machine) and then ran 2 wash cycles (without detergent). I found bubbles in the water, which is an indication of detergent build up. I then line-dried them, n they haven’t smelled that bad again.
Sometimes you may have to add bleach if simple hot water stripping doesn’t work. Adding ½ cup of bleach to the first wash cycle and then run 2-3 wash cycles and an extra rinse cycle will help you get rid of any bleach residue.
To avoid diapers from smelling bad it is advisable to rinse right after use and store them in an airy container or pail. Wash them thoroughly and use warm water cycles and an extra rinse cycle. Washing them everyday or alternate day helps tremendously.

Other things that have been great aids in my CDing journey so far are:-
1. A Diaper Pail









2. Eco-friendly CD liners









3. Wet Bag









That’s it from me.

This was my experience of cleaning/storing/washing and stripping the diapers. If you have more to add, please share it here with me.

Happy Diapering!

AI2, AIO, bumberry, bumgenius, cloth, cloth diapers, cute diapers, diapers, eco-friendly, infant, new born, new mothers, pampers, pocket diapers, smartbottoms, superbottoms, sustainability, sustainable

The Poo-Pee keeper (An introduction to cloth diapering)

My initial days of motherhood were only spent on feeding and changing nappies/diapers,burping the baby A and when i say “only” i do mean only.  I felt like an overtired cow who frequently got showered at with baby’s pee ( luckily baby A didn’t poop that often).
It was this that asked me to look for more options other than traditional langots and modern disposable diapers which may leave your baby with rashes, earth more polluted and you with a hole in your pocket. I googled for more options in nappies, but didn’t find much help, tried using cloth liners etc. But to no avail, only until i bumped on a post about cloth diapers and then there was no looking back. I discovered this wonderful world of cloth diapering and was amazed to see so many new age mommies addicted to the colourful lot of fluffs. But why would you really want to make diapering so complex, when there are so many good brands of modern disposable diapers available to keep your baby dry and happy? 
Well the pros of cloth-diapering outnumber the cons giving you reasons enough to switch to CDs.
#1. Cloth diapers are economical:- initially it may look like an expensive choice but in longer run it will prove to be an investment which certainly is cheaper than disposable diapers.

#2. They make this earth a cleaner place by not adding to sanitary waste. How disposable diapers add up to the pollution is non-debatable; and this should be a good enough reason for environment conscious parents to switch to CDs.

#3. Skin friendly; since its just the cloth it is safer and better for your baby’s skin.

#4. They serve more than one purpose; yes, you read it right! the cloth diapers (covers) can be used as swimming diapers; these diapers save you from buying bloomers/underwears that you would otherwise buy to cover disposable diapers.  

#5. They are bright, beautiful & colourful making you want for more as your little one’s bum get smarter/cooler and cuter. ( well that’s why perhaps some brands are SMARTBOTTOMS,BUMGENIUS etc)


As a new mom who learnt through trial and error I will just give my two cents to help others with smoother diapering experience. In the beginning it may look like a mammoth of a task to choose from the whole range of diapers ( they come at a price and you must think before plunging in). Before spending a fortune, it is best to try out different options to check what works best for you and your baby. Some common kinds of cloth diapers are:

1. Prefolds: the traditional grandma’s diapering choice. These are rectangular shaped diapers that are folded lengthwise in three sections and secured with snappy/ velcro or safety pin. I have personally never used flats or prefolds, but there are moms who swear by their goodness. Firstly they are real cheap, you can customise them to your baby’s shape and need and they need much less care.
prefolds
image source: osocozy website
2. Covers: These are PUL covers that restrict the leak. One needs to put an insert in the cover. Few of my first CDs were covers. They are good because you don’t have to keep changing the whole diaper; esp. in places that see heavy monsoon as these reduce the laundry pile, because you can just change the insert if the cover is intact and poop-free.
Covers

3. Pocket diapers .Pocket diapers are my first diapers and half of my stash consists of pocket diapers. These mainly consist of a water proof outer layer, another stay dry layer, and a pocket opening where inserts/soakers are put. Most of these pocket diapers are lined in either fleece or suede cloth to have the baby feel dry because the urine is absorbed by the insert that is inside the pocket.
Pocket Diaper

4. AIO- This stands for “All in one” these are diapers with attached/sewn soaker and these leave you free of the hassle of fixing the inserts. Though convenient to change, AIOs can be slightly expensive as compared to other CDs.
All In One

5. AI2- these are all in two diapers with a main soaker and a mini soaker. these could be just used as covers or with your choice and no. of soakers. Most of them have pockets as well, so the soakers can either be inserted or snapped on; the shell can be reused if the inserts are snapped in. These are extremely easy to use and cost effective.

All in 2

My stash has a combination of  all the above types except pre-folds and these are Indian, Singaporean and American Brands (thanks to Baby A’s Aunt and daddy’s job that requires him to travel all across the globe) I have been using these diapers depending upon hours I need to diaper my baby (I give a lot of diaper free time) and some I prefer for outdoors while others for the night diapering. I came to make these decisions after a lot of trial and I am still learning.

Hope you found it helpful for your cloth-diapering journey; more about prepping, cleaning, maintaining and folding the cloth diapers Here.

Happy diapering 🙂